Advanced English Conversation & Advanced English Listening Skills, learn advanced English listening and speaking online

Level 5: Advanced English Audio Lessons

 Level 1.> Level 2 >.Level 3 > Level 4 > Level 5 

Learn Advanced English Listening, Advanced English Conversation, English slang and humour - and understand both the great and the subtle differences between British and American English!

How to see the text
Click on black: click again to hide

 Information: 1. How to use DailyStep Lessons                  
                      2. What is a DailyStep subscription?

A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step...  

Lesson
Functions
Notes

Melissa: Can I have a word with you in private please ?

Robert: Yes,  what is it? I’m incredibly busy at the moment. 

Melissa: Well,  I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together, we are going to have to draw up some ground rules.  We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we?

Robert: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault, I suppose ?

Melissa: No, no, I’m not saying that! I’m just trying to get to the root of the problem and to understand where we’re going wrong.  I’m not trying to lay all the blame at your feet. I know that I probably share at least fifty percent (50%) of the responsibility.

Robert: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order. Let’s start this conversation over again, shall we?

Melissa: Yes, let’s. As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a bit better. Unless we try to address the problem it is just going to get worse and worse as time goes on and it is in both of our interests to sort it out.

 

 

Situation: Melissa approaches her colleague Robert to discuss that fact that their problematic relationship is making their working life very difficult. He is initially hostile but then opens up.

Style: trying to avoid confrontation

 

Functions:

  1. Asking to speak with someone about an important matter: Can I have a word with you in private please? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Prefacing an awkward opinion: Well, I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together we are going to have to draw up some ground rules.(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Using understatement: We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Reacting angrily to criticism: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault, I suppose(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Apologising for an extreme reaction: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Expressing an opinion: As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a bit better(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Indicating the best course of action: it is in both of our interests to sort it out (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

 

 

Notes:

  1. Can I have a word with (idiom) you..? = Could I speak to you..?

  2. in private = alone / not in the presence of other people

  3. I’m incredibly busy = I have a lot of work to do

  4. I don’t like having to say this = I would prefer not to have to say this

  5. to draw up (phrasal verb) = to establish / to agree / to list 

  6. ground rules (idiom) = basic rules or principles for how we proceed or behave

  7. We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = We are getting on (phrasal verb) very badly

  8. getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = having a very friendly relationship

  9. it’s all my fault = I’ve caused the problem / I am the one who is to blame 

  10. I’m not saying that = that is not what I mean

  11. to get to the root of (idiom) = to find the cause of or the reason for

  12. to lay all the blame at your feet (idiom) = to hold you fully responsible for it

  13. I’m being out of order (idiom) = I’m being unreasonable / I am behaving badly

  14. As far as I’m concerned = In my opinion

  15. get along (phrasal verb) a bit better = relate to each other better / have a better relationship / get on (phrasal verb) ) a bit better

  16. to address the problem = to try to find a solution to the problem

  17. as time goes on (phrasal verb) = as time progresses 

  18. it is in both of our interests to sort it out = it would be beneficial to both you and I to find a solution

  19. to sort it out (phrasal verb) = to find a solution to the problem

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_GB-01

Functions:

  1. Asking to speak with someone about an important matter: Can I have a word with you in private please? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Prefacing an awkward opinion: Well, I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together we are going to have to draw up some ground rules.(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Using understatement: We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Reacting angrily to criticism: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault, I suppose(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Apologising for an extreme reaction: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Expressing an opinion: As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a bit better(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Indicating the best course of action: it is in both of our interests to sort it out (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. Can I have a word with (idiom) you..? = Could I speak to you..?

  2. in private = alone / not in the presence of other people

  3. I’m incredibly busy = I have a lot of work to do

  4. I don’t like having to say this = I would prefer not to have to say this

  5. to draw up (phrasal verb) = to establish / to agree / to list 

  6. ground rules (idiom) = basic rules or principles for how we proceed or behave

  7. We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = We are getting on (phrasal verb) very badly

  8. getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = having a very friendly relationship

  9. it’s all my fault = I’ve caused the problem / I am the one who is to blame 

  10. I’m not saying that = that is not what I mean

  11. to get to the root of (idiom) = to find the cause of or the reason for

  12. to lay all the blame at your feet (idiom) = to hold you fully responsible for it

  13. I’m being out of order (idiom) = I’m being unreasonable / I am behaving badly

  14. As far as I’m concerned = In my opinion

  15. get along (phrasal verb) a bit better = relate to each other better / have a better relationship / get on (phrasal verb) ) a bit better

  16. to address the problem = to try to find a solution to the problem

  17. as time goes on (phrasal verb) = as time progresses 

  18. it is in both of our interests to sort it out = it would be beneficial to both you and I to find a solution

  19. to sort it out (phrasal verb) = to find a solution to the problem

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_GB-01

Functions:

  1. Asking to speak with someone about an important matter: Can I have a word with you in private please? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Prefacing an awkward opinion: Well, I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together we are going to have to draw up some ground rules.(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Using understatement: We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Reacting angrily to criticism: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault, I suppose(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Apologising for an extreme reaction: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Expressing an opinion: As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a bit better(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Indicating the best course of action: it is in both of our interests to sort it out (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. Can I have a word with (idiom) you..? = Could I speak to you..?

  2. in private = alone / not in the presence of other people

  3. I’m incredibly busy = I have a lot of work to do

  4. I don’t like having to say this = I would prefer not to have to say this

  5. to draw up (phrasal verb) = to establish / to agree / to list 

  6. ground rules (idiom) = basic rules or principles for how we proceed or behave

  7. We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = We are getting on (phrasal verb) very badly

  8. getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = having a very friendly relationship

  9. it’s all my fault = I’ve caused the problem / I am the one who is to blame 

  10. I’m not saying that = that is not what I mean

  11. to get to the root of (idiom) = to find the cause of or the reason for

  12. to lay all the blame at your feet (idiom) = to hold you fully responsible for it

  13. I’m being out of order (idiom) = I’m being unreasonable / I am behaving badly

  14. As far as I’m concerned = In my opinion

  15. get along (phrasal verb) a bit better = relate to each other better / have a better relationship / get on (phrasal verb) ) a bit better

  16. to address the problem = to try to find a solution to the problem

  17. as time goes on (phrasal verb) = as time progresses 

  18. it is in both of our interests to sort it out = it would be beneficial to both you and I to find a solution

  19. to sort it out (phrasal verb) = to find a solution to the problem

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_GB-01

Lesson
Functions
Notes

Melissa: Can I have a word with you in private please ?

Robert: Yes,  what is it? I’m incredibly busy at the moment. 

Melissa: Well,  I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together, we are going to have to draw up some ground rules.  We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we?

Robert: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault.

Melissa: No, no, I’m not saying that! I’m just trying to get to the root of the problem and to understand where we’re going wrong.  I’m not trying to lay all the blame at your feet. I know that I probably share at least fifty percent (50%) of the responsibility.

Robert: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order. Let’s start this conversation over again, shall we?

Melissa: Yes, let’s. As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a little better. Unless we try to address the problem it is just going to get worse and worse as time goes on and it is in both of our interests to work this out.

 

 

Situation: Melissa approaches her colleague Robert to discuss that fact that their problematic relationship is making their working life very difficult. He is initially hostile but then opens up.

Style: trying to avoid confrontation

 

Functions:

  1. Asking to speak with someone about an important matter: Can I have a word with you in private please? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Prefacing an awkward opinion: Well, I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together we are going to have to draw up some ground rules. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Using understatement: We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Reacting angrily to criticism: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Apologizing for an extreme reaction: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Expressing an opinion: As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a little better(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Indicating the best course of action: it is in both of our interests to work this it out (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

 

 

Notes:

  1. Can I have a word with (idiom) you..? = Could I speak to you..?

  2. in private = alone / not in the presence of other people

  3. I’m incredibly busy = I have a lot of work to do

  4. I don’t like having to say this = I would prefer not to have to say this

  5. to draw up (phrasal verb) = to establish / to agree / to list 

  6. ground rules (idiom) = basic rules or principles for how we proceed or behave

  7. We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = We are getting on (phrasal verb)very badly

  8. getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = having a very friendly relationship

  9. it’s all my fault = I’ve caused the problem / I am the one who is to blame 

  10. I’m not saying that = that is not what I mean

  11. to get to the root of (idiom) = to find the cause of or the reason for

  12. to lay all the blame at your feet (idiom) = to hold you fully responsible for it

  13. I’m being out of order (idiom) = I’m being unreasonable / I am behaving badly

  14. As far as I’m concerned = In my opinion

  15. get along (phrasal verb) a little better = relate to each other better / have a better relationship/ get on (phrasal verb) a little better

  16. to address the problem = to try to find a solution to the problem

  17. as time goes on (phrasal verb) = as time progresses 

  18. it is in both of our interests to sort it out = it would be beneficial to both you and me to find a solution

  19. to work this out (phrasal verb) = to find a solution to the problem

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_US-01

Functions:

  1. Asking to speak with someone about an important matter: Can I have a word with you in private please? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Prefacing an awkward opinion: Well, I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together we are going to have to draw up some ground rules. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Using understatement: We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Reacting angrily to criticism: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Apologizing for an extreme reaction: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Expressing an opinion: As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a little better(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Indicating the best course of action: it is in both of our interests to work this it out (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. Can I have a word with (idiom) you..? = Could I speak to you..?

  2. in private = alone / not in the presence of other people

  3. I’m incredibly busy = I have a lot of work to do

  4. I don’t like having to say this = I would prefer not to have to say this

  5. to draw up (phrasal verb) = to establish / to agree / to list 

  6. ground rules (idiom) = basic rules or principles for how we proceed or behave

  7. We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = We are getting on (phrasal verb)very badly

  8. getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = having a very friendly relationship

  9. it’s all my fault = I’ve caused the problem / I am the one who is to blame 

  10. I’m not saying that = that is not what I mean

  11. to get to the root of (idiom) = to find the cause of or the reason for

  12. to lay all the blame at your feet (idiom) = to hold you fully responsible for it

  13. I’m being out of order (idiom) = I’m being unreasonable / I am behaving badly

  14. As far as I’m concerned = In my opinion

  15. get along (phrasal verb) a little better = relate to each other better / have a better relationship/ get on (phrasal verb) a little better

  16. to address the problem = to try to find a solution to the problem

  17. as time goes on (phrasal verb) = as time progresses 

  18. it is in both of our interests to sort it out = it would be beneficial to both you and me to find a solution

  19. to work this out (phrasal verb) = to find a solution to the problem

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_US-01

Functions:

  1. Asking to speak with someone about an important matter: Can I have a word with you in private please? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Prefacing an awkward opinion: Well, I don’t like having to say this but I think if you and I are to continue working together we are going to have to draw up some ground rules. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Using understatement: We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire, are we (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Reacting angrily to criticism: Oh, and you think it’s all my fault(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Apologizing for an extreme reaction: I’m sorry. I’m being out of order(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Expressing an opinion: As far as I’m concerned, I can’t see any good reason why you and I can’t get along a little better(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Indicating the best course of action: it is in both of our interests to work this it out (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. Can I have a word with (idiom) you..? = Could I speak to you..?

  2. in private = alone / not in the presence of other people

  3. I’m incredibly busy = I have a lot of work to do

  4. I don’t like having to say this = I would prefer not to have to say this

  5. to draw up (phrasal verb) = to establish / to agree / to list 

  6. ground rules (idiom) = basic rules or principles for how we proceed or behave

  7. We’re not exactly getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = We are getting on (phrasal verb)very badly

  8. getting along like a house on fire (idiom) = having a very friendly relationship

  9. it’s all my fault = I’ve caused the problem / I am the one who is to blame 

  10. I’m not saying that = that is not what I mean

  11. to get to the root of (idiom) = to find the cause of or the reason for

  12. to lay all the blame at your feet (idiom) = to hold you fully responsible for it

  13. I’m being out of order (idiom) = I’m being unreasonable / I am behaving badly

  14. As far as I’m concerned = In my opinion

  15. get along (phrasal verb) a little better = relate to each other better / have a better relationship/ get on (phrasal verb) a little better

  16. to address the problem = to try to find a solution to the problem

  17. as time goes on (phrasal verb) = as time progresses 

  18. it is in both of our interests to sort it out = it would be beneficial to both you and me to find a solution

  19. to work this out (phrasal verb) = to find a solution to the problem

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_US-01

Lesson
Functions
Notes

Robert: OK, I agree with you that if we’re going to work side by side, we’re going to have to establish some common ground.  There’s no need for us to be at each other’s throats all the time.

Melissa: So, what do you propose?

Robert: Well, we work in very close proximity to each other and our tasks overlap to some extent, so we’re bound to fall out or have disagreements from time to time.  We work in a high pressure environment and a little bit of friction is inevitable.

Melissa: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up - and I let my emotions get the better of me. 

Robert: So do I, you’re not the only one. But even though we’re both part of the same team working towards the same goal, there’s no need for us to be treading on each other’s toes all the time.  Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we could pool our efforts and resources for the common good. 

 

.

Situation: Two colleagues, Melissa and Robert, try to establish the reason for their differencesand look for a solution.

Style: honest and diplomatic

.

Functions:

  1. Asking for input: What do you propose? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Softening a negative comment: We work in a high pressure environment and a little bit of friction is inevitable. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Partially agreeing: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well,...(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Introducing a negative and completely honest opinion: But – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Correcting yourself in order to use more appropriate language: – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Using less personal, more diplomatic language to avoid causing offence: sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Agreeing: So do I, you’re not the only one(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  8. Suggesting an alternative: Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we could pool our efforts and resources for the common good. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

 

.

Notes:

  1. side by side = together / next to each other

  2. to establish = to agree

  3. some common ground (idiom) = some things to agree upon (phrasal verb) / somesimilarities of opinion

  4. to be at each other’s throats (idiom) = to be arguing intensely with each other

  5. What do you propose? = What do you suggest?

  6. in very close proximity to (more formal) = very near to / very close to

  7. tasks = jobs that have to be done

  8. overlap = cover the same territory 

  9. to some extent = to a degree

  10. we’re bound to = it is inevitable that we will

  11. disagreements = arguments 

  12. from time to time = occasionally

  13. a high pressure environment = a stressful situation

  14. friction = problems caused by working closely together / bad atmosphere and unfriendliness

  15. inevitable = unavoidable / impossible to avoid

  16. I accept that = I agree with what you have just said

  17. to make allowances for it = to take it into consideration / to take it into account / to allow for (phrasal verb) it

  18. to be totally frank = to be completely honest

  19. you just wind me up (phrasal verb) = you just irritate me / you just make me angry

  20. or rather = or, as a correction to what I just said,

  21. I get wound up (phrasal verb) = I get annoyed or angry / I become annoyed or angry(note: the speaker has changed the verb from the active voice - ‘you wind me up’ - to the passive voice - ‘ I get wound up’ - as this is a lot less personal and takes the accusatory element out of the comment. It is therefore a lot more diplomatic.)

  22. I let my emotions get the better of me (idiom) = I allow my emotions to take control of me, and therefore I may not be act rationally

  23. goal = objective

  24. treading on each other’s toes (idiom) = irritating each other in areas of overlapping responsibility

  25. pool our efforts = combine our efforts / work together

  26. for the common good = for the benefit of everyone

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_GB-02

Functions:

  1. Asking for input: What do you propose? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Softening a negative comment: We work in a high pressure environment and a little bit of friction is inevitable. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Partially agreeing: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well,...(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Introducing a negative and completely honest opinion: But – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Correcting yourself in order to use more appropriate language: – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Using less personal, more diplomatic language to avoid causing offence: sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Agreeing: So do I, you’re not the only one(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  8. Suggesting an alternative: Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we could pool our efforts and resources for the common good. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. side by side = together / next to each other

  2. to establish = to agree

  3. some common ground (idiom) = some things to agree upon (phrasal verb) / somesimilarities of opinion

  4. to be at each other’s throats (idiom) = to be arguing intensely with each other

  5. What do you propose? = What do you suggest?

  6. in very close proximity to (more formal) = very near to / very close to

  7. tasks = jobs that have to be done

  8. overlap = cover the same territory 

  9. to some extent = to a degree

  10. we’re bound to = it is inevitable that we will

  11. disagreements = arguments 

  12. from time to time = occasionally

  13. a high pressure environment = a stressful situation

  14. friction = problems caused by working closely together / bad atmosphere and unfriendliness

  15. inevitable = unavoidable / impossible to avoid

  16. I accept that = I agree with what you have just said

  17. to make allowances for it = to take it into consideration / to take it into account / to allow for (phrasal verb) it

  18. to be totally frank = to be completely honest

  19. you just wind me up (phrasal verb) = you just irritate me / you just make me angry

  20. or rather = or, as a correction to what I just said,

  21. I get wound up (phrasal verb) = I get annoyed or angry / I become annoyed or angry(note: the speaker has changed the verb from the active voice - ‘you wind me up’ - to the passive voice - ‘ I get wound up’ - as this is a lot less personal and takes the accusatory element out of the comment. It is therefore a lot more diplomatic.)

  22. I let my emotions get the better of me (idiom) = I allow my emotions to take control of me, and therefore I may not be act rationally

  23. goal = objective

  24. treading on each other’s toes (idiom) = irritating each other in areas of overlapping responsibility

  25. pool our efforts = combine our efforts / work together

  26. for the common good = for the benefit of everyone

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_GB-02

Functions:

  1. Asking for input: What do you propose? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Softening a negative comment: We work in a high pressure environment and a little bit of friction is inevitable. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Partially agreeing: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well,...(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Introducing a negative and completely honest opinion: But – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Correcting yourself in order to use more appropriate language: – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Using less personal, more diplomatic language to avoid causing offence: sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Agreeing: So do I, you’re not the only one(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  8. Suggesting an alternative: Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we could pool our efforts and resources for the common good. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. side by side = together / next to each other

  2. to establish = to agree

  3. some common ground (idiom) = some things to agree upon (phrasal verb) / somesimilarities of opinion

  4. to be at each other’s throats (idiom) = to be arguing intensely with each other

  5. What do you propose? = What do you suggest?

  6. in very close proximity to (more formal) = very near to / very close to

  7. tasks = jobs that have to be done

  8. overlap = cover the same territory 

  9. to some extent = to a degree

  10. we’re bound to = it is inevitable that we will

  11. disagreements = arguments 

  12. from time to time = occasionally

  13. a high pressure environment = a stressful situation

  14. friction = problems caused by working closely together / bad atmosphere and unfriendliness

  15. inevitable = unavoidable / impossible to avoid

  16. I accept that = I agree with what you have just said

  17. to make allowances for it = to take it into consideration / to take it into account / to allow for (phrasal verb) it

  18. to be totally frank = to be completely honest

  19. you just wind me up (phrasal verb) = you just irritate me / you just make me angry

  20. or rather = or, as a correction to what I just said,

  21. I get wound up (phrasal verb) = I get annoyed or angry / I become annoyed or angry(note: the speaker has changed the verb from the active voice - ‘you wind me up’ - to the passive voice - ‘ I get wound up’ - as this is a lot less personal and takes the accusatory element out of the comment. It is therefore a lot more diplomatic.)

  22. I let my emotions get the better of me (idiom) = I allow my emotions to take control of me, and therefore I may not be act rationally

  23. goal = objective

  24. treading on each other’s toes (idiom) = irritating each other in areas of overlapping responsibility

  25. pool our efforts = combine our efforts / work together

  26. for the common good = for the benefit of everyone

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_GB-02

Lesson
Functions
Notes

Robert: OK, I agree with you that if we’re going to work side by side, we’re going to have to establish some common ground.  There’s no need for us to be at each other’s throats all the time.

Melissa: So, what do you propose?

Robert: Well, we work in very close proximity to each other and our tasks overlap to some extent, so we’re bound to fall out or have disagreements from time to time.  We work in ahigh-pressure environment and a little friction is inevitable.

Melissa: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up - and I let my emotions get the better of me. 

Robert: So do I, you’re not the only one. But even though we’re both part of the same team working towards the same goal, there’s no need for us to be stepping on each other’s toes all the time.  Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we could pull together and combine our resources for the common good. 

 

.

Situation: Two colleagues, Melissa and Robert, try to establish the reason for their differences and look for a solution.

Style: honest and diplomatic

.

Functions:

  1. Asking for input: What do you propose? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Softening a negative comment: We work in a high-pressure environment and a little friction is inevitable. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Partially agreeing: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well,...(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Introducing a negative and completely honest opinion: But – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Correcting yourself in order to use more appropriate language: – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Using less personal, more diplomatic language to avoid causing offence: sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Agreeing: So do I, you’re not the only one(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  8. Suggesting an alternative: Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we couldpull together and combine our resources for the common good. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

 

.

Notes:

  1. side by side = together / next to each other

  2. to establish = to agree

  3. some common ground (idiom) = some things to agree upon (phrasal verb) / some similarities of opinion

  4. to be at each other’s throats (idiom) = to be arguing intensely with each other

  5. What do you propose? = What do you suggest?

  6. in very close proximity to (more formal) = very near to / very close to

  7. tasks = jobs that have to be done

  8. overlap = cover the same territory 

  9. to some extent = to a degree

  10. we’re bound to = it is inevitable that we will

  11. disagreements = arguments 

  12. from time to time = occasionally

  13. a high-pressure environment = a stressful situation

  14. friction = problems caused by working closely together / bad atmosphere and unfriendliness

  15. inevitable = unavoidable / impossible to avoid

  16. I accept that = I agree with what you have just said

  17. to make allowances for it = to take it into consideration / to take it into account / to allow for(phrasal verb) it

  18. to be totally frank = to be completely honest

  19. you just wind me up (phrasal verb) = you just irritate me / you just make me angry

  20. or rather = or, as a correction to what I just said,

  21. I get wound up (phrasal verb) = I get annoyed or angry / I become annoyed or angry (note: the speaker has changed the verb from the active voice - ‘you wind me up’ - to the passive voice - ‘ I get wound up’ - as this is a lot less personal and takes the accusatory element out of the comment. It is therefore a lot more diplomatic.)

  22. I let my emotions get the better of me (idiom) = I allow my emotions to take control of me, and therefore I may not be act rationally

  23. goal = objective

  24. stepping on each other’s toes (idiom) = irritating each other in areas of overlapping responsibility

  25. pull together = combine our efforts / work together

  26. for the common good = for the benefit of everyone

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_US-02

Functions:

  1. Asking for input: What do you propose? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Softening a negative comment: We work in a high-pressure environment and a little friction is inevitable. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Partially agreeing: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well,...(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Introducing a negative and completely honest opinion: But – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Correcting yourself in order to use more appropriate language: – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Using less personal, more diplomatic language to avoid causing offence: sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Agreeing: So do I, you’re not the only one(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  8. Suggesting an alternative: Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we couldpull together and combine our resources for the common good. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. side by side = together / next to each other

  2. to establish = to agree

  3. some common ground (idiom) = some things to agree upon (phrasal verb) / some similarities of opinion

  4. to be at each other’s throats (idiom) = to be arguing intensely with each other

  5. What do you propose? = What do you suggest?

  6. in very close proximity to (more formal) = very near to / very close to

  7. tasks = jobs that have to be done

  8. overlap = cover the same territory 

  9. to some extent = to a degree

  10. we’re bound to = it is inevitable that we will

  11. disagreements = arguments 

  12. from time to time = occasionally

  13. a high-pressure environment = a stressful situation

  14. friction = problems caused by working closely together / bad atmosphere and unfriendliness

  15. inevitable = unavoidable / impossible to avoid

  16. I accept that = I agree with what you have just said

  17. to make allowances for it = to take it into consideration / to take it into account / to allow for(phrasal verb) it

  18. to be totally frank = to be completely honest

  19. you just wind me up (phrasal verb) = you just irritate me / you just make me angry

  20. or rather = or, as a correction to what I just said,

  21. I get wound up (phrasal verb) = I get annoyed or angry / I become annoyed or angry (note: the speaker has changed the verb from the active voice - ‘you wind me up’ - to the passive voice - ‘ I get wound up’ - as this is a lot less personal and takes the accusatory element out of the comment. It is therefore a lot more diplomatic.)

  22. I let my emotions get the better of me (idiom) = I allow my emotions to take control of me, and therefore I may not be act rationally

  23. goal = objective

  24. stepping on each other’s toes (idiom) = irritating each other in areas of overlapping responsibility

  25. pull together = combine our efforts / work together

  26. for the common good = for the benefit of everyone

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_US-02

Functions:

  1. Asking for input: What do you propose? (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  2. Softening a negative comment: We work in a high-pressure environment and a little friction is inevitable. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  3. Partially agreeing: Yes, I accept that and I do try to make allowances for it, but – well,...(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  4. Introducing a negative and completely honest opinion: But – well, to be totally frank, sometimes you just wind me up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  5. Correcting yourself in order to use more appropriate language: – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  6. Using less personal, more diplomatic language to avoid causing offence: sometimes you just wind me up – or rather, I should say, I get wound up (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  7. Agreeing: So do I, you’re not the only one(note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

  8. Suggesting an alternative: Maybe instead of being in competition with one another, we couldpull together and combine our resources for the common good. (note: please copy the tone and emphasis carefully)

Notes:

  1. side by side = together / next to each other

  2. to establish = to agree

  3. some common ground (idiom) = some things to agree upon (phrasal verb) / some similarities of opinion

  4. to be at each other’s throats (idiom) = to be arguing intensely with each other

  5. What do you propose? = What do you suggest?

  6. in very close proximity to (more formal) = very near to / very close to

  7. tasks = jobs that have to be done

  8. overlap = cover the same territory 

  9. to some extent = to a degree

  10. we’re bound to = it is inevitable that we will

  11. disagreements = arguments 

  12. from time to time = occasionally

  13. a high-pressure environment = a stressful situation

  14. friction = problems caused by working closely together / bad atmosphere and unfriendliness

  15. inevitable = unavoidable / impossible to avoid

  16. I accept that = I agree with what you have just said

  17. to make allowances for it = to take it into consideration / to take it into account / to allow for(phrasal verb) it

  18. to be totally frank = to be completely honest

  19. you just wind me up (phrasal verb) = you just irritate me / you just make me angry

  20. or rather = or, as a correction to what I just said,

  21. I get wound up (phrasal verb) = I get annoyed or angry / I become annoyed or angry (note: the speaker has changed the verb from the active voice - ‘you wind me up’ - to the passive voice - ‘ I get wound up’ - as this is a lot less personal and takes the accusatory element out of the comment. It is therefore a lot more diplomatic.)

  22. I let my emotions get the better of me (idiom) = I allow my emotions to take control of me, and therefore I may not be act rationally

  23. goal = objective

  24. stepping on each other’s toes (idiom) = irritating each other in areas of overlapping responsibility

  25. pull together = combine our efforts / work together

  26. for the common good = for the benefit of everyone

.

Audio file name: DailyStep-5_business-communication-003_US-02